PHS Curriculum » Social Studies Course Descriptions

Social Studies Course Descriptions

Social Studies

 

420 WORLD HISTORY      Grade 11     5.0 CR 

422 CP WORLD HISTORY Grade 11     5.0 CR 

424 H WORLD HISTORY   Grade 11     5.0 CR 

In this class students will be studying the diversity and the histories of the world including, but not limited to, the earliest cultures, the rise and fall of the great empires of the world, and the many revolutions that brought us into modern times. The course will begin with a brief review of the birth of civilizations and will end with the study of the modern world. Students will be challenged through lessons and activities that require higher-order thinking and will reinforce Geography and Social Studies skills.

426 AP WORLD HISTORY     Grade 11     5.0 CR 

This course counts as World History credit The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of different types of human societies, their interactions with one another, and the nature of change in a global context. It covers events in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students will be taught to analyze the processes and causes involved with continuities and changes. The course allows students to act as historians in analyzing historical events and evidence worldwide. In addition, students will have ample practice in writing analytical and interpretive essays that will prepare them to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

428 AP EUROPEAN HISTORY     Grades 11-12     5.0 CR 

Prerequisite: CP US History 2 or Higher or AP US History

Students are provided an opportunity to explore topics in European History. Following a chronological outline, the course introduces a variety of sources and viewpoints in European History from the Renaissance to the present. Traditional narrative, political, and economic history are viewed against newer concepts in historiography. Students are expected to demonstrate historical analysis in their writing and participation in class discussion. Course content follows The College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum in European History.

430 US HISTORY 1          Grade 9     5.0 CR 

432 CP US HISTORY 1     Grade 9     5.0 CR 

434 H US HISTORY 1       Grade 9     5.0 CR 

This course begins with the American Revolution (1763 to 1783) and ends with American Imperialism (1900-1914). Students will examine political, economic and social changes of the United States throughout the nineteenth century. A portion of the course is also devoted to the study of Geography, Government, Economics, and Social Studies Skills.

436 PRE-AP US HISTORY     Grade 9     5.0 CR 

This course counts as US I credit This course includes the study of political institutions, social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in US History. The course uses themes and/or topics beginning with the Age of Discovery and concluding with the Civil War era. The themes are designed to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past and to focus on historical change over time. The course teaches students to analyze evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course includes extension instruction in analysis and interpretation of a wide variety of primary sources, such as documentary materials, maps, statistical tables, works of art, and pictorial and graphic materials. The course provides students with practice in writing analytical and interpretive essays. This course will prepare the students to take the Advanced Placement exam.

440 US HISTORY 2          Grade 10     5.0 CR 

442 CP US HISTORY 2     Grade 10     5.0 CR 

444 H US HISTORY 2       Grade 10     5.0 CR 

This course begins with late nineteenth century American imperialism and concludes with Contemporary America. The course includes how the United States became a world power in the years before and after the Spanish-American War. It continues with the domestic policy of the United States and foreign policy issues, such as American involvement in both World Wars, the Cold War and its current focus on the war on terror.

446 AP US HISTORY     Grades 10-12     5.0 CR

Prerequisite: Pre-AP US History or H US History I

This course counts as US II credit This course includes the study of political institutions, social and cultural developments, diplomacy, and economic trends in US History. The course uses themes and/or topics beginning with the Civil War era and concluding with Contemporary American Society. The themes are designed to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past and to focus on historical change over time. The course teaches students to analyze evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course includes extensive instruction in analysis and interpretation of a wide variety of primary sources, such as documentary materials, maps, statistical tables, works of art, and pictorial and graphic materials. The course provides students with frequent practice in writing analytical and interpretive essays such as document-based questions (DBQ) and thematic essays. This course will prepare the students to take the Advanced Placement exam.

448 AP GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: UNITED STATES and COMPARATIVE     Grades 11-12     5.0 CR

Prerequisite: An Honors History Class and teacher approval

The purpose of the first part of this course is to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. Students will become familiar with various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. They will also become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. The major goal is to ascertain the factors and influences, which impact upon the processes that drive the operations of US government. The purpose of the second part of this course is to introduce students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States by using a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries (Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria). Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues.

450 CP ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL LITERACY     Grades 11-12     2.5 CR 

This course will be an introduction to the principles of economics and focus on contemporary economic issues and global problems. Examples of topics studied are: banking, taxation, the stock market, international trade, labor unions, and comparative economic systems. There will also be time spent on personal financial management which will include: budgeting, checking, savings and investment, consumer smarts and after high school (college applications, interviewing, resume, etc.).

451 H MICROECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL LITERACY     Grades 11-12     2.5 CR 

Prerequisite: Honors level Mathematics class or higher

This course will challenge students in the study of advanced microeconomic principles and focus on contemporary economic issues. Students will study the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. There will also be time spent on personal financial management which will include: budgeting, checking, savings and investment, consumer smarts and after high school (college applications, interviewing, resume, etc.). This course will place rigorous demands upon student’s study skills and work ethic in completing homework/projects.

452 AP MICROECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL LITERACY     Grades 11-12     5.0 CR

Prerequisite: Honors level Mathematics class or higher and Departmental Approval

AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. The course will also spend time on personal finance which will include: budgeting, investing, credit, preparing for after college and consumer smarts. This portion of the course will fulfill the mandatory personal finance credits needed in order to graduate.

454 CP MYTHOLOGY     Grades 10-12     5.0 CR 

This course offers the student a study of classical myths and those of other cultures for personal enrichment and for better understanding of the development of language and literature. Classic myths such as Perseus, Theseus, Jason and the Argonauts, the Iliad, and the Odyssey will be read and analyzed. Students will realize how the myths explain ancient cultures, but also teach us about our modern world.

456 CP SOCIOLOGY     Grades 10-12     2.5 CR 

The course is open to all sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in the study of human society and social behavior. It includes further analysis of culture and social structure, the individual in society and socialization, adolescence as a distinct life stage, and various social issues.

460 AP PSYCHOLOGY     Grades 11-12     5.0 CR 

Prerequisite: H English 2 or higher with final average of 80% or higher

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenome associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

470 H AMERICAN LAW STUDIES     Grades 10-12     5.0 CR 

This course will examine the Constitution of the United States and its application to the social, economic, and political issues that have confronted the country over the past two centuries. This course will be divided into three components. First, the course will review the philosophical underpinnings of the American legal system and the historical development of the court system. The second component examines the powers and relationships among government institutions and the interaction between the legislative, judicial and executive branches. The final component, civil rights and civil liberties, examines the relationship between the individual and the government.